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It happened about 10 years ago: a nurse from the reception area rushed into my resident’s office urgently:

“Emergency in the second operating room. A severe case! The patient is in critical condition.” I ran there. As I entered, the medical team had already gathered; on the table lay a six-year-old girl. While I was getting dressed and sterilizing equipment, I learned the details of the history. There was a car accident; a family of 4 was affected: father, mother, and two children — twins, a boy, and a girl. The girl was seriously injured. The rest of the family members were stable.The impact occurred exactly on the side where she was sitting. She lost a lot of blood, had serious injuries, and trauma. Soon, the blood test results arrived. It turned out she needed type O positive, and we didn’t have it.

I have never encountered such a case in my practice: a 6-year-old boy was ready to give his life for his sister.

I have never encountered such a case in my practice: a 6-year-old boy was ready to give his life for his sister.

A difficult situation, even critical. Parents were urgently called. It turned out that the mother had type A, and the father had type B. Since she had a twin brother, they thought he might be a match. I went to talk to him. I saw him sitting in the corridor, crying. I said to him, “Anetchka (the girl) is seriously injured.” He replied, “I know. She was right where it all happened. She was asleep at that time

.” I reassured him, “Nothing is lost yet. You can save her. We need a part of your blood.” He agreed without hesitation. “Let’s go with Aunt Maria to the office where she will take your blood. Trust her; she’s very nice.” “Okay, as you say. Mom, I love you! You’re the best! And you too, Dad. Thank you for everything you’ve done for me.”

I have never encountered such a case in my practice: a 6-year-old boy was ready to give his life for his sister.

I went to the operating room, and the boy went with the nurse to the office. The operation was successful. Afterward, I went to check on the boy and share the good news. He was lying under a blanket, resting. I approached and said, “You’re a real hero! You saved your sister!” He asked, “Is she okay?” I assured him, “Yes, absolutely!” Then he asked, “When will I die?” I replied, “Not now, young man… Many, many years later

. When you’re old, then you can think about it.” At that moment, the situation seemed bad to me. Just a naive question from a little boy. Only later did I realize that he actually thought that after donating blood, he would die. That’s what he believed. And, most importantly, he was willing to do it for his beloved sister. To this day, when I recall this story, I get goosebumps.

I have never encountered such a case in my practice: a 6-year-old boy was ready to give his life for his sister.

By admin

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